Haemophilia Research Paper

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There are three different types of this disorder each having its own range of severity. The first and most common type of Haemophilia is type A, this type is usually caused by a missing or defective VIII protein. Haemophilia is present in around 1 in every 5000 males. The range of severity in type A ranges from mild to severe. Mild cases are the most common, it is generally only discovered when the afflicted gains a severe enough injury, when having tooth extractions or other surgeries and in many cases the afflicted does not realise until adulthood or even at all. In the rare cases of a female haemophiliac, mild type A can sometimes cause a heavier menstrual cycle, and haemorrhaging during childbirth. The next level of severity is moderate;…show more content…
Symptoms of haemophilia in young children include, excessive gum bleeding while teething, excessive bleeding from cuts in the mouth and easy or unexplained bruising after falls. Usually children do not get spontaneous joint bleeding until after the age of two. As children get older the symptoms can extend to excessive bleeding when teeth are lost, blood in the urine, surface bruising and the previously mentioned spontaneous bleeding into joints and soft tissue. As children grow older they tend to find ways to keeps the symptoms from affecting their everyday life through experience (This does not mean that the haemophilia is any less severe). Treatments such as pain medications and factor replacement products can be used to lessen joint pain and to make the symptoms less severe, though there is no cure for haemophilia at this time. The severity of the disorder depends on the amount of the factor VIII protein is prevalent in the afflicted. The amount of factor VIII needed for a person to not have the disorder is 50% to 150%, the amount needed for a mild severity is 5%-40%, the amount needed for a moderate severity is 1% to 5% and the amount needed for a high severity is less than…show more content…
Coagulation has 4 main parts, the first is constriction, this involves the narrowing of blood vessels to slow blood flow, the next is the activation of platelets by thrombin, which accumulate at the site of the injury to form an impermanent, platelet plug. Fibrinogen is the main protein used in platelet clumping. Then a fibrin mesh (clot) is formed and ensnares the plug to give it stability. Finally the clot must dissolve to return blood flow to its original state, this occurs after the tissue has been repaired to a suitable standard. A haemophiliac lacks the proteins needed to ensure this process at the normal pace, this means that the clotting process is slowed enough that the bleeding time has extended passed the normal rate. Depending on the severity of the protein deficiency this can be a very large or very small time
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