Harriet Tubman Fight for Freedom Essay

1699 WordsMay 19, 20127 Pages
A Long Journey Fighting Slavery A strong and powerful lady said these wise words: “There was one of two things I had a right to, liberty or death; if I could not have one, I would have the other; for no man should take me alive; I should fight for my liberty as long as my strength lasted, and when the time came for me to go, the Lord would let them take me”. The brave women who said these words were Harriet Tubman and she was one of the leaders of the Underground Railroad that helped slaves reach freedom. “Although not an actual railroad of steel rails, locomotives and steam engines, the Underground Railroad was real nevertheless” (encyclopedia The Civil War and African Americans 329) The term “Underground Railroad” referred to the…show more content…
This is how Harriet Tubman even as a child, helped a slave reach freedom and it was a big part of what inspired her to gain her own freedom and want to help other slaves escape. Even though Harriet Tubman was never taught to read or write she was very strong willed, religious and smart and she believed that people had the right to be free and did not think it was right to beat people just because they did not have white skin. Harriet was determined to be free and help others, “she would become a beacon of hope to other slaves, “Moses” helping to set her people free”. (Harriet Tubman Moses of the Underground Railroad 23) Araminta married a white man named Richard Tubman when she was in her twenties. She still worked as a slave for her master but at night she was allowed to stay with her husband. She tried to talk to her husband about escaping but he just got mad and said that he would turn her in, so without Harriet telling him, she and three of her brothers decided to escape. Her brothers became scared and turned back but Harriet made it to Philadelphia. When Harriet Tubman arrived in Philadelphia she later remembered feeling that “I had crossed the line of which I had so long been dreaming. I was free. She said she felt as if she were in heaven.” (Harriet Tubman Moses of the Underground Railroad 35) She got a job in Philadelphia and saved as much money as she could so that she could help other slaves to
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