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Reporting Practices and Ethics
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Reporting Practices and Ethics

A major aspect of health care organization operation is that of financial management. Financial management of health care organizations incorporates ethical standards and proper reporting practices. Financial practices and ethical finance concerns are important to the success of any organization, particularly within the health care industry. The four elements of financial management, generally accepted accounting practices (GAAP), and general financial ethics standards are part of ensuring fair and accurate financial reporting from health care organizations. Examining examples of ethical standards of conduct and reporting standards helps to understand the
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“ In order to prevent fraudulent financial reports and statements, the American Institute of Certified Public Accountants(AICPA) has created ethical standards” (Ethical standards in a financial statement, 2011). These standards aim to make financial professionals accountable for their accounting practices. This includes the integrity of financial reporting and ensuring financial reporting is done fairly and factually. Financial accountants and professionals should maintain professional integrity, objectivity, and independence to reduce the risk of resulting legal action, loss of profits, and a poor reputation if improper financial reporting is done (Ethical standards in a financial statement, 2011).

Examples of Fraudulent Financial Reporting in Health care

According to the article Anatomy of a Financial Fraud (2004),

A forensic audit conducted by PricewaterhouseCoopers concluded that HealthSouth Corporation 's cumulative earnings were overstated by anywhere from $3.8 billion to $4.6 billion, according to a January 2004 report issued by the scandal-ridden health-care concern. HealthSouth acknowledged that the forensic audit discovered at least another $1.3 billion dollars in suspect financial reporting in addition to the previously estimated $2.5 billion. The scandal 's postmortem report
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