Healthcare System Of The United States

1368 WordsJul 3, 20166 Pages
Our healthcare system consumes nearly 3 trillion dollars annually yet fails to deliver the value it should. (CMS, 2014) Among 191 national health care systems the United States ranked 37th in overall performance, not to mention ranking 39th in infant mortality, 36th in life expectancy, and even poorer in adult male and female mortality. (WHO, 2000, 2009) If there is a single category in which the U.S. healthcare system ranked 1st, embarrassingly, is healthcare spending per capita. A question thus arises; “Why are we spending so much yet getting so little?” Therefore, stating that we [The U.S.] provide the highest quality healthcare would not only be an understatement, but it would be a complete farce. We have well characterized the nature of our “beast”; now only remains “What is the platform on which our problem thrives and how do we fix it?” Many leading experts agree that a major [if not, the sole] responsibility of the dwindling healthcare system lies on the shoulders of healthcare insurance models. Given the recent development and deployment of the Patient Protection and Affordable Care Act [colloquially Obamacare] the nation now lies on the hands of government and its decision to adopt such federal statue. This status is largely based on the Accountable Care Organization model (ACO). The ACO model brings about the promise to improve patient health outcomes while reducing costs. Herein we explore the “opportunity at redemption” from a sinking healthcare system and why
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