Hermano Pule

1668 Words Aug 29th, 2011 7 Pages
Apolinario de la Cruz (Hermano Pule):
Religious Fanatic or Advocate of Religious Freedom?

Table of Contents I. Introduction .................................................................................................. p. 3-4 II. Significance of the Study ............................................................................. p. 5 III. Body ............................................................................................................. p. 6-8 IV. Conclusion .................................................................................................... p. 9 V. Sources........................................................................................................... p. 10

I.
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It established a common ground among the Filipino people and understanding that this will help them attain their dreams of social change, equality and freedom. It became a voice for change and a tool for them to achieve social transformation in the society.

III. Body
A man who was strong believer of God, a man who decided to fight for achieving equal rights for his fellowmen, a man who articulated problems in relation to unequal debts and obligations imposed upon them and proposed solutions and ways out of them, and a man who got out of his comfort zones and became a leader of a peasant movement. He is no other than, Apolinario de la Cruz, commonly known as Hermano Pule.
Hermano Pule was born on July 22, 1814 in Lucban, Tayabas province of “relatively well-to-do peasant parents” Pablo de la Cruz and Juana Andres, both of which were religious and zealous Catholics (Ileto, 1979). At a young age of 15, he decided to enter the “monastic life” or to become a priest for which purpose he came to Manila (Ileto, 1979). He had received primary religious affiliations and instructions which inspired him to join a Dominican order in Manila. But being an Indio thwarted his plans of entering the religious order because during that time Roman Catholic religious orders were closed to native people which were the Indio’s (Zaide, 1970). This did not stop him from rendering religious services; he decided to become a
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