"…He's Giving Us the Rope- so That We'Ll Hang Ourselves." to What Extent Do You Agree with This Description of the Role of the Inspector?

4353 WordsSep 28, 200618 Pages
"…he's giving us the rope- so that we'll hang ourselves." To what extent do you agree with this description of the role of the Inspector? The quotation, "…he's giving us the rope to hang ourselves." I think means that the Inspector will allow the family to condemn themselves by criticizing each other, instead of staying together and supporting each other. In this way, the Inspector would be able to clinch information that otherwise he would not be able to get from normal methods of interrogation. It suggests that the Inspector sets the family members against each other by partially revealing some or just parts of information. The Inspector has two main techniques of questioning; he either sparks an argument in the family, and then…show more content…
I think there is a possibility that the Inspector could be Eva Smith and just goes back to haunt them. This maybe quite far fetched but I would not rule it out completely, because if it were true then it would explain everything. You feel that the Inspector knows everything already, and that by telling him, you are not giving information, but confessing to what you have done- which he already knows. This makes Sheila and Eric in particular give a lot more information than is necessary to the questions that the Inspector asks. The Inspector sets up a scene, and then inserts snippets of information that two parties will both be able to individually interpret, and will reveal more than necessary. The Inspector makes the information he gives ambiguous in order to draw the largest reaction. In this way, he is able to play off their response and extract more information from them. In some aspects, Inspector's character seems to be ahead of his time. The manner in which he conducts his questioning seems to be more advanced than the way in which they are received. Also the way in which he conducts himself gives the impression of being ahead of the family that he is questioning. He also has the sensibility of someone who lived during the 1945/46, after the wars. The Inspector does not ‘fit' in with the way in which things where done during the time of this play. Priestley makes the Inspector seem ahead of his

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