“Hey, Sarah? What Do You Want To Do When You Grow Up?”.

1126 WordsMar 1, 20175 Pages
“Hey, Sarah? What do you want to do when you grow up?” My cheerful friend asked out-of-the-blue, one hot summer evening. It had been an exhausting day at camp: full of rock climbing, zip lining, horseback riding, and swimming. Our seven-year-old bodies couldn’t take much more- we ached and longed for our beds- but my best friend, Caroline, and I hadn’t seen each other for months and were determined to make the most of our time together. We decided to sneak off to our “secret place” by the giant lone oak tree that we would climb every summer since we were five. It had been hours since we started talking by that old tree and I was fighting myself to stay awake. We had already told each other what we’ve been up to the past few months, talked…show more content…
At the young age of four, I had absolutely no concept of death, it was would take a year and several friend’s passing, before I would start to understand. It was then that the little, rambunctious Caroline became my hospital roommate. We quickly bonded and were inseparable, causing chaos throughout the hospital: Using our IV poles as scooters, racing down the halls, and using our outdoor voices in the halls. I didn’t handle the chemo as well as Caroline did and was in the hospital far more often than she was. We were diagnosed a few weeks apart and were on the same protocol, although we had different doctors. Caroline liked her doctor and I absolutely adored mine. It was my doctor Zipf, after all, who first inspired me to be a Pediatric Oncologist in the first place. I would copy everything he did and take note of all the words and phrases he used so that I too could speak like he did. After starting school, I realized that I truly loved learning, especially scientific topics, and I was even more certain that I wanted to go into the medical field. However, Caroline would lose her fight with Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia (ALL) on a peaceful, cool spring day when the two of us were still in junior high school, despite our circumstances being the same at the time of diagnosis. It has been many years since then but my desire to work in the medical field has remained the same as when I was just a four-year-old girl who simply
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