Essay about Hinduism, Hindutva, Colonial and Post-Colonial Myths

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Hinduism, Hindutva, Colonial and Post-Colonial Myths
"During this period (early history of the British in India) in India, while the Europeans fought one another and the British intrigued among themselves for personal advantage, Mughals killed Mughals, Rajputs killed Rajputs, Mughals killed Rajputs, Rajputs killed Mughals, British killed Mughals and Rajputs, Mughals and Rajputs killed British, and starvation and taxation kept killing the farmers and laborers of India as usual." 1
This is how Wendy Doniger defines the pre-independence early history of India (of the 19th century) in her book ‘The Hindus: An Alternative History’. Karl Marx too in an article that he wrote for the ‘The New York Daily Tribune’ describes an India that has
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Hinduism, Hindutva, Colonial and Post-Colonial Myths
"During this period (early history of the British in India) in India, while the Europeans fought one another and the British intrigued among themselves for personal advantage, Mughals killed Mughals, Rajputs killed Rajputs, Mughals killed Rajputs, Rajputs killed Mughals, British killed Mughals and Rajputs, Mughals and Rajputs killed British, and starvation and taxation kept killing the farmers and laborers of India as usual." 1
This is how Wendy Doniger defines the pre-independence early history of India (of the 19th century) in her book ‘The Hindus: An Alternative History’. Karl Marx too in an article that he wrote for the ‘The New York Daily Tribune’ describes an India that has either always been under the influence of foreign powers or remained in a state of discord because of continuous internal conflicts that took place within castes and tribes. This western view of India and the denial of there ever having been ‘A Golden Indian Age’ led to the orthodoxy in the conception of the idea of Indian Nationalism. Nationalism, even though a borrowed western idea itself, had to necessarily be adopted to refute the notions of India as a barbaric and savage country. And in doing so, through a propagation of myths and in other places through the terming of some real facts as myths by both colonial and the native population, a history was created that could in no way have remain unbiased and unjust to a large section of the
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