Hip Hop And Its Influence On American Culture

1543 WordsDec 2, 20147 Pages
The introduction of Hip Hop in the 70s and the 80s brought about anew genre of music, which not only created a message and movement for African-Americans, but also provided them with a never before chance of changing their lives. During this time one of the main ways for a black person to make any type of money was through selling crack, and it was not until the Hip Hop came about that there was hope for a different life. Majority of famous Hip Hop artists that emerged in the beginning of Hip Hop had themselves been involved in dealing because there were no other options. Hip-hop was the way for dealers to escape that lifestyle, and instead make money through sharing their stories of what was happening on the streets. Many artists were…show more content…
He was able to realize he “wasn’t even in high school yet and I’d discovered my voice. But I still needed a story to tell” , and through dissecting artists of that time he knew what story he had to tell. He did not want to preach about life on the streets, or life once escaping the streets, but rather the hustle that connected the two. He felt this was necessary because the story and beat were what made rap such a significant type of music. The beat played such a key role in the flow of a song, but “just like beats and flows work together, rapping and hustling, for me at least, live through each other”. The hustle was sparked by the introduction of crack, and the ability for children and young teens to take control because they had the money to support their families, and they were the ones with the power. Once Jay-Z got involved in selling crack, writing lyrics took a back seat, but he knew the story of his generation was what had to be told. He wanted to spread the truth of what was happening to children his age, not just the glamorized or over dramaticized, but rather “the interior space of a young kid’s head ,” who was in this environment. Crack ruined many relationships he had, as well as put him in a situation where death and addiction was a constant, but was what made him, and majorly what he accredits to this “moral education ”. These ideas
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