History of the Declaration of Independence and The Declaration of the Rights of Man and of the Citizen

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In one corner we have a nation, fed up with the corruption and constant bullying of their big brother nation, seeking the approval of the world for a revolution. In the other corner we have a nation, bent on gaining the equality among all individuals in their state, coming together to lay down the law to their king. Both America and France had a thirst for a new equal nation and government in which power was given to the people and not to a tyrannical figure. Individuals from both of these countries sat down and wrote up a letter of declaration in demand of the freedom that they so rightfully deserved. Both of them won that freedom, as the Declaration of Independence and the Declaration of the Rights of Man and of the Citizen flourished …show more content…
The first and most prominent argument I have with these two documents is there method in itself. Both declarations gave direct and justified reasons for a revolution, but the Declaration of Independence seemed to have taken a passive role. It argued that King George and the British were wronging them and that America was at their last straw. America was being oppressed and grew tired of it. The Declaration stated that the British were infringing on their God-given rights as humans, imposing taxes without consent, denying fair trials, as well as many other grievances that attacked the American colonies. Therefore, with their back against the wall they had to separate themselves from the British and establish their own government or live their lives in fear forever. In contrast, The French’s Declaration of the Rights of Man and of the Citizen took on a more active role. The French people, also known as the National Assembly, banded together and came up with a list of seventeen laws that they felt gave power to the people over those of nobility. They felt that the king and the noble’s lack of concern or ignorance of the rights of man was the cause of such a corrupted government, and that gave them a justified reason for revolt. The Declaration of the Rights of Man shows more comparison to America’s Constitution or Bill of Rights than to the Declaration of Independence. It stated the rights they were warranted and an obligation for the government to