Hitler's Germany Doc Analysis

1799 Words Apr 28th, 2015 8 Pages
The Author

Guida Diehl was the founder and leader of the Newland Movement, which pre-dated the Nazi Party by at least six years. She came from a nationalist and anti-Semitic family, and only joined the Nazi Party in August 1930. Following the advice of Adolf Stocker, who hated Jews and supported the emancipation of unmarried women, she attended social-work school and later worked as a teacher of social work in Frankfurt. Diehl constantly preached a spiritualist, quasi-Christian, and nationalist message, that went against the postwar values of Americanism, materialism, and mammonism, which threatened to overpower Volk, God, and fatherland.

Diehl wholly supported National Socialist goals, the Nazi’s anti-communism and anti-Semitism,
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National Socialism tried, with some success, to do away with the traditional separation between the private and public sphere, and the document identifies the importance in allowing the integration of the personal and private sphere. In principle, the personal and private spheres existed and functioned exclusively for the benefit of the public and the political, for the Volksgemeinschaft and the race, in the specific context of a dictatorship.

The documents were released during a period when Hitler was rising to power and in the process of establishing his dictatorship. Hitler understood the force of women as an asset in a revolution, and Diehl’s documents were released at the right time to support Hitler’s views and approach to the treatment of women. Diehl’s ideology was very much in line with that of Nazism and she was thus an effective mouthpiece for Hitler’s thoughts and was able to influence women into supporting the Nazi Party.

Document Analysis

The document serves to support Hitler’s plan to create a community of German people, the Volksgemeinschaft, in which women played a crucial role. Nazi ideology defined the community in opposition to the individualistic society produced by liberal democracies and the false sense of community promoted by the communists. In other words, Hitler aimed to create a German community of people that
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