Hong Kong Cinema

1452 Words Feb 17th, 2012 6 Pages
Sam Maloney
International Cinemas
September 19th, 2011
Restivo, MW 12:00
EXAM 1
“One artistic strength of Hong Kong cinema, then, is its use of parallels and motifs—musical, visual, or verbal—to bind together episodically plotted films.” : In Plots p 120 So far in this Chinese Cinemas class, I have noticed something every film we have viewed in class and every Hong Kong film I have watched outside of the lecture: the stories flow perfectly. At first the films could come off as confusing and spotty with all the kung-fu and epic stories. The Hong Kong films we have viewed so far have these elaborate story lines that, with thanks to pristine editing and construction, flow perfectly and the story is conveyed to the viewer with no
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She’s the one who wants to be a singer!” The use of homosexuality becomes a bit more serious, as serious homosexuality can get in this comedy, when Sam begins to find Wing, still disguised as a he, attractive. When Wing listens to Sam play the piano in his apartment, you can tell that something has change between them. Even Rose takes notice by how much attention Sam is giving Wing, saying, “If you were a girl, I’m certain Sam would be after you.” This also gets Wing thinking about Sam and how much she likes him. For her, the feelings are normal because she’s a woman liking a man, but Sam’s feelings for Wing are more complex because he has no idea about Wing being a woman. But, Sam grows more attached to Wing because of “his” personality and his ability to lead a simple life. When Sam suggests leaving for Africa, Wing seems ecstatic about the idea, compared to Rose who just wants to go shopping. They almost kiss while playing with the puppets and Sam mentions how important Wing is to him. He abruptly leaves to go to Rose and demands sex, as if that will make him forget about his feelings for Wing. But, even while he is having sex with Rose, he has a vision that he is having sex with Wing. He begins to question his love for Wing, and

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