How Audiences Perceive Strong Female Characters, Oppenheimer, Goodman, Adams ‐ Price, Codling, And Coker

1327 Words6 Pages
To test how audiences perceive strong female characters, Oppenheimer, Goodman, Adams‐Price, Codling, and Coker (2003) ran a study where they had participants rate strong female characters on a feminine to masculine scale, as well as attractiveness, sex appeal, relatability not a word, and humor on a 7-point scale. The aim was to see how participants would respond to a female voice, if an assertive actress would be characterized as masculine, and in general how female characters are perceived by viewers. What they found was that women found the female characters to be slightly stronger than men did, that the actresses were seen as slightly feminine do you mean they were found to be slightly above the mean for femininity? Not sure what “slightly feminine” means, and that attractiveness, sex appeal, and humor had no real impact on the perception of power. Also provide more detail here – were there weaker female characters that were also rated? Or those perceived as less attractive? Knowing that women and men both consume and internalize representations and stereotypes portrayed in media, it is important to then look at how women are being depicted and what some causes behind this shift could be. Lauzen and Dozier (2005) investigated if popular films continue to carry out the idea too vague – use more precise language that men are powerful and successful and women are submissive and not as successful by looking at an analysis of the top 88 domestic grossing films of 2002.

    More about How Audiences Perceive Strong Female Characters, Oppenheimer, Goodman, Adams ‐ Price, Codling, And Coker

      Get Access