How Did Hitler Establish a Dictatorship in Germany from 30th January 1933 to August 1934?

1365 Words Oct 10th, 2012 6 Pages
How Did Hitler Establish A Dictatorship In Germany From 30th January 1933 To August 1934?

On The 30th of January 1933, President Hindenburg appointed Hitler as Chancellor. In the 18 months succeeding this, Hitler became, essentially, a dictator. This essay will look at what a dictatorship is and how it operates, how the population is brought to a point where they accept a dictatorship, and examine and analyze the vital events that took place in Germany which lead to Hitler assuming dictatorial power: the Reichstag fire, the Emergency Decree, the Enabling Act, the banning of trade unions and other political parties, the Night Of The Long Knives, the death of President Hindenburg, and the German army’s oath of loyalty to Hitler. It will
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The Emergency Decree, as stated earlier, placed substantial restrictions on the people’s personal freedom, illustrating Hitler’s step toward a dictatorship.

Considering how harsh Hitler’s dictatorship was, it is hard not to wonder how and why the population accepted his dictatorship. Hitler brought the population to this point mainly by the use of propaganda, the manipulation and brainwashing of German youth, and, most importantly, the use of terror .

Issued on March 24th, 1933, and officially named the “Law for Removing the Distress of the People and the Reich”, the Enabling Act essentially meant the end of democracy in Germany, establishing the legal dictatorship of Hitler, by giving him “the power to make laws without the approval of either the Reichstag or the President” . But why would the Reichstag vote for a dictator, and in effect, vote themselves out of existence? In order to ensure that the Reichstag voted in favor of the Enabling Act, Hitler used the method of intimidation and terror to coerce them – when the members of the Reichstag met in the Kroll Opera House to vote, “the [armed] SA and SS men lined up at the exits” 4 menacingly.

Proceeding the Enabling Act was the banning of trade unions and the Nazis’ political opponents. On May 2nd, 1933, trade unions were closed – their leaders were put in prisons, and their money was confiscated. Replacing the trade unions was the German Labor Front. The GLF not only reduced workers’
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