How Do the Works of Yasumasa Morimura, Julie Rrap and Anne Zahalka Challenge Conventional Ways in Which Gender Has Been Depicted Historically in the Visual Arts?

1537 WordsJul 23, 20127 Pages
Task Structured Essay Examine selected artworks by: Yasumasa Morimura, Julie Rrap and Anne Zahalka. How do the works of Yasumasa Morimura, Julie Rrap and Anne Zahalka challenge conventional ways in which gender has been depicted historically in the visual arts? In your response select at least two different artists and discuss the following: * Through the postmodern frame of reference, explain how artists have appropriated historical artworks. How has the artist incorporated parody and wit into the work? In what way has the artist questioned the values implied in the original artwork? * Explain ways in which the artist has become the subject of the work. What issues does this raise about the, role of the artist, Subject…show more content…
French impressionists such as Gaugin, Manet and Monet are some of the many who were overcome by this bombardment of Asian art. Morimura has introduced wit into this work by substituting rose leaves in the place of fig leaves to hide his genitals. This can be seen as a form of revenge on Manet for he was a ‘pupil’ of Japanese art. This mystery of sexual identity also leads to a sense of intertextuality that stems from Morimura’s role as an androgynous critic. “East meets West in my work, but I haven’t made an attempt to merge the two worlds. They exist in opposition” (Morimura 1990). The post-modernist Julie Rrap is a contemporary artist whose focal point rests on the basis of femineity and the way the female identity is represented historically within art. She is a feminist who accuses the ‘male gaze’ of instigating a predatory activity that is accustomed with the norm of society. She relates this norm to existing social structures that are attributed with a patriarchal society, where women were nothing more than sexual objects. All in all this term, the ‘male gaze’ evaluates the predatory voyeurism of society, where the male is the active subject and the female is a passive object of representation. This trait of a submissive female is reversed within Rrap’s exhibition; Persona and Shadow: Puberty 1984. This piece is an appropriation and deconstruction of Edvard Munch’s work; Puberty 1894 which

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