How Does Golding Present Simon in Lord of the Flies-What Is His Role?

1402 Words Jan 2nd, 2013 6 Pages
How Does Golding Present Simon In the Novel-what is his role?
William Goldings "Lord of the flies", portrays a group of boys who find themselves stranded on a desert island in a deep battle between civilisation and primitive savagery. One of the boys portrayed, Simon, a boy who is kind and physically fragile expresses a deeper knowledge of the problems on the island that the other boys are unaware of. There are many differing viewpoints on his role in the novel. One of these is that he is a biblical parallel; Simon portrays a saintly figure, and shows many of the qualities demonstrated by Jesus Christ. He demonstrates a strong connection with nature throughout, and also is shown to be a character of strong goodwill and kindness.
One of
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He help the littluns to get fruit, and 'pulled off the choicest from up in the foliage, passed them back down to the endless, outstretched hands'. He also helps Piggy to get his glasses back when Jack has knocked them off, showing that he does not discriminate against Piggy because he is different but chooses to help him, even if this may cause him to suffer in the future. These may indicate that Simon, though other characters may be thought of as "good" and kind, such as Piggy or Ralph, Simon shows no flaws at all.
Simon possesses a deep knowledge and understanding about the truth of the island and the beast of which the other boys know not. He also seems to posses many mystic qualities. He is the first to understand truly that the beast is not a physical or material being, but something that lives within the boys. Unlike piggy or Ralph, who are able to appreciate adult knowledge and understanding, Simon possesses the ability to see the darker side of knowledge. For Simon, the eyes of the Pig's head on the stick are "dim with the infinite cynicism of adult life", meaning that adults believe nothing is ideal, therefore his realisation in itself is cynical-- the beast lives within the children, making Simon distrust the human nature. He knows the truth but is unable to get it across to the other boys; "Simon became inarticulate in his effort to express mankind's' essential illness". Simon understands the truth behind the beast- that the
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