How Elizabeth Cady Stanton Shaped Society and Empowered Women

885 Words Jul 15th, 2018 4 Pages
Elizabeth Cady Stanton

There have been many great feminists throughout history, who have changed and shaped society, all who have worked toward one goal, to empower women all over the world. One of these women, Elizabeth Stanton who fought for women’s suffrage was able to shape the way a nation perceived and fought for the rights of their people, allowing the women of today to benefit from her accomplishments on a substantial scale.

Elizabeth Stanton was born on the 12th of November 1815, in Johnstown New York. She was fortunate enough to enjoy a privileged life and grew up among the wealthy. The daughter of Daniel Cady, a prominent judge and Margaret Livingstone, she was the eighth of eleven children. Stanton received the best
…show more content…
During the 1800’s, women were subject to increasing discrimination, especially throughout the public sphere. Women were expected to take care of the house, children, and the husband. There was a fundamental belief that men owned their wives, allowing a gross

inequality of power to reside with the male. Married women did not have the right to own their own property, manage their own wages or sign a contract.

One of the many women who were angered at the lack of women’s rights and recognition was Susan B. Anthony who was a major influence in the life of Stanton and together led a movement to give women the right to vote. Anthony was heavily involved in temperance, the movement to reduce or prohibit the use of alcoholic beverages as a result of the many social and economic problems that were occurring, including the physical abuse of wives at the hands of their drunken husbands. Together they campaigned for the abolition of slavery, the right for women to own their own property and retain their own earnings.

Through this partnership, Stanton achieved many great things throughout her life, her utmost being that she held the first Woman’s Rights convention at Seneca Falls, New York in 1848. During this time she wrote “The Declaration of Sentiments,” calling for changes in law and society in areas such as education and politics. Her relentless campaigning, pressuring Congress to