How Fredrick Douglass Conveys His Points in "The Narrative Life of Fredrick Douglass" Through Syntax, Imagery, and Figures of Speech

664 WordsAug 30, 20133 Pages
Fredrick Douglass explains in this excerpt from The Narrative Life of Fredrick Douglass that no matter how hard they try, a white person will never understand what its like living the life of a slave. Throughout the excerpt Fredrick Douglass talks about how freedom from slavery is not how he ever imagined it would be. He says that once free, he was lonely and could trust no one, which contradicts all the positive connotations of freedom. This excerpt, in addition to the whole narrative, is aimed at white intelligent people since Fredrick Douglass’s audience could only people who knew how to read and write in 1838. Fredrick Douglass conveys his point through his syntax, imagery, and figures of speech. An example of Douglass’s syntax is…show more content…
This shows the reader clearly that when a slave is freed they feel as if they can start a whole new and great life with no worries at all. But what Douglass soon realizes is that the idea of freedom couldn’t be more different than the real thing. “Where he is every moment subjected to the terrible liability of being seized upon by his fellow-men, as the hideous crocodile seizes upon his prey!” In this sentence, Douglass really shows the reader how he views his life of freedom. He compares other people, specifically white people, to crocodiles and how they seize their prey to the way white people could turn on him at any second. The imagery Douglass infuses in with the metaphors further conveys how he feels toward freedom and slavery. “…as the ferocious beasts of the forest lie in wait for their prey.” The term ferocious beasts puts an image of unfriendly, scary faces all watching Douglass, waiting for him to crack to do something wrong that would lead him back to a life of slavery. Fredrick Douglass is an inspiring individual to many today. But knowing how hard it is even when he was free from slavery really shows how strong Douglass was. His use of juxtaposition clearly states how freedom in reality was. One my think that once free everything was great, but this shows that freedom wasn’t like everyone perceives. I was hard and lonely, knowing that one slip up could land one right back where they were. Trusting no one in fear of being hurt or

    More about How Fredrick Douglass Conveys His Points in "The Narrative Life of Fredrick Douglass" Through Syntax, Imagery, and Figures of Speech

      Open Document