How Funny Do You Find ‘Waiting for Godot'? Explore the Ways in Which Beckett Uses Humour in the Play and the Likely Impact That This Would Have on the Audience.

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Although ‘Waiting for Godot' is seen to be very depressing and contains many elements which may mark it as a tragedy, the four characters create a great deal of humour in their mannerisms and their behaviour. Beckett created the concept of ‘The Theatre of the Absurd', a play on human emotions and character which may give off feelings of despair, yet also of humour simultaneously. Most of the time, the audience tends to laugh at the helplessness created by Vladimir and Estragon in the play, and the play can be seen to be very funny at times, a prime example being when every character present has fallen to the floor and is supposedly unable to get up. Beckett uses humour for a number of different purposes in the play, which will be outlined…show more content…
A range of stage directions are used in the scene where the four characters stumble to the floor: ‘He tries to pull Pozzo to his feet, fails, tries again, stumbles, falls, tries to get up, fails'. This scene shows how the characters may resemble clowns, quite foolish and clumsy. Beckett's intentions with this scene are to expose Vladimir and Estragon for what they really are, lazy incompetent tramps. I find this scene highly amusing because of how logically silly it seems for four grown men to be unable to get up, and the audience would react in a similar way. Humour is used to reverse the mood from a panic state (with regards to Pozzo) to a more relaxed state. The stage directions are crucial in creating this humour.

Finally, I find Lucky's speech amusing due to the complete randomness and unpredictability of the words that spew from his mouth. Lucky is a character who lacks any kind of substance, he is totally reliant on his master Pozzo, and it is said in the play how even if Lucky could, he would not leave Pozzo. Lucky's speech has no punctuation or structure at all, and is all one sentence making it hard for an audience to take his words seriously. Beckett again relates back to the ‘Theatre of the Absurd', and although the audience will feel bewildered at Lucky's words, his speech is a source of comedy due to its

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