How Important Was the Role of Hitler in the Rise to Power of the Nazis

1814 WordsMay 6, 20138 Pages
How important was the role of the leader in the rise to power of the Nazis in Germany On the 30th January 1933 Adolf Hitler became Chancellor of Germany. Hitler came to power as the leader of the National Socialist German Workers Party, more commonly known as the Nazi Party. In the July election of 1932 the Nazis received the highest vote ever achieved by any party in Weimar History with 13.7 million votes. This is a crucial point in history as it was Hitler who led the world into World War II which resulted in the death of 60 million people. Many questions are asked as to how such a man could legitimately come to power and create a totalitarian dictatorship in a modern country such as Germany. One popular reason for Hitler coming to…show more content…
This was on top of them not having support from either the army or the judiciary. This meant that they were left with very little support whatsoever and really had no hope. In January 1919 the Spartacists revolted. The army silenced this revolt with brutality. However, when there was a right-wing revolt in 1920 the army refused to act on it. General Von Seeckt claimed ‘’Troops do not fire on troops’’. It was not just the army that favourited right-winged politics, the Judiciary was also against the communists. On average a left wing terrorist got fifteen years in prison for crimes of murder compared to the four weeks a right wing terrorist received. Another problem was the Weimar’s failure to deal with the problem caused by inflation spiralling out of control in 1923. In 1924 a postage stamp was sold for more than a Berlin villa had in 1890. The lack of improvement to the economy was making the government increasingly unpopular. Eventually the problem was solved in 1924 by Gustav Stressemann who was a leading figure in German politics until 1929. This period is often referred to as the ‘’Golden Years’’ as it saw some good brought back to Germany as unemployment dropped and the economy grew. However it is argued that this was because of multiple American loans which were agreed in the Dawes Plan. This may have periodically boosted the economy and morale in Germany but when the New York stock exchange crashed in 1929
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