How Is Text Messaging Affecting Teen Literacy and Other Aspects of their Life

700 Words 3 Pages
Almost a generation of teens have access to a phone with text messages. They spend so much time shorting words, they lose the ability to be literate. Teenagers today are more worried about their phones, in school or out of school, causing them to drop their grades and get them in lots of trouble. The telephone was invented in 1870 by Gray and Bell, who then battled over the true inventor of the telephone, which Bell won. Bell then began experimenting with electrical signs, which brought the telegraph to be an established means of communication (Bellis). In 1876, Bell made his first call to Thomas A. Watson in March. People thought Bell’s invention was a toy, but later people wanted a phone installed in their homes, towns, or …show more content…
Almost a generation of teens have access to a phone with text messages. They spend so much time shorting words, they lose the ability to be literate. Teenagers today are more worried about their phones, in school or out of school, causing them to drop their grades and get them in lots of trouble. The telephone was invented in 1870 by Gray and Bell, who then battled over the true inventor of the telephone, which Bell won. Bell then began experimenting with electrical signs, which brought the telegraph to be an established means of communication (Bellis). In 1876, Bell made his first call to Thomas A. Watson in March. People thought Bell’s invention was a toy, but later people wanted a phone installed in their homes, towns, or businesses. In 1877, the first telephone appeared in Wisconsin by Alfred Galpin (Jelen). In 1999, people could start sending text messages to other people. With different networks to their own, life became easier because of text messaging users. Soon later, English language became known as ‘text speak’, a way we write now by abbreviating long and big words. This is causing teens to lose the ability to learn how to spell and read. Now that text messaging allows kids to abbreviate, kids are now failing school classes by abbreviating in their school work (Cooke). In December 1992, the first text message ever was sent out. The message read ‘Merry Christmas’, by Neil Papworth an engineer (Cooke). Back in 1984, Matti Makkonen was in Copenhagen at a
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