How Plautus And Terence Write Slave Characters

1200 WordsOct 14, 20165 Pages
Introduction Terentian and Plautine comedies have several similarities and differences; this is most evident what examining how Plautus and Terence write slave characters. Since slavery was a prominent institution in the Roman Empire, Slavery and slave stock characters commonly appeared in both Roman’s plays. Despite adapting similar works and using similar stock characters, there are major differences between slaves in Terentian comedy and slaves in Plautine comedy. Many authors have attempted to explain the sources of these differences and similarities. Modern classicists’ theories have become more focused on the culture of Terence and Plautus and less focused on the goals of Terence and Plautus; this literature review seeks to explore how modern classicists differ when explaining the similarities and differences between Terence’s and Plautus’ representations of slavery. It will do so by breaking down firstly the unique purposes of slaves in Terentian plays, secondly the unique purposes of slaves in Plautine plays, and finally the commonality between Terence’s and Plautus’ representations of slaves. Each of these categories will be examined with the help of two of Kathleen McCarthy’s texts and one of J. C. B. Lowe’s texts on the subject. Motifs for adding and Representation of Slavery When considering Terence’s motive for his representations of slaves as characters it is imperative to understand how his work simultaneously responded to Plautus’ slaves and drew on

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