How Shakespeare Presents the Falling in Love of Ferdinand and Miranda

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How Shakespeare Presents the Falling in Love of Ferdinand and Miranda

The concept of the relationship between Miranda and Ferdinand is one of the fundamental aspects of the play. In relation to the plot itself, the eventual idea that the pair will eventually end up together is part of Prospero's 'big plan', as it were. Shakespeare not only presents their falling in love and relationship as an important part of the make up of his play, but also uses the two characters to bring up a number of different concepts and themes, in addition to showing the audience the internal struggle Prospero faces and as a means to look more closely at the character of the 'protagonist'.

This idea that Prosper is the
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Prospero is in two minds over his daughter; he has decided that he wants to orchestrate her marriage to Ferdinand, but on another side he is reluctant subconsciously to let go of her. This brings out many psychological themes such as male dominance and the need to exert power and authority over Ferdinand. While the audience knows that inevitably the couple will end up together, there is a strain and tension in Prospero's strain to giver her up. This slight awkwardness and tension reflects the idea of 'tempest'. In front of Miranda he accuses Ferdinand of being a usurper, which connects to this underlying paranoia and almost 'Achilles heel' in his psyche about his being overthrown and betrayed twelve years previously. It seems that the rather comical scene is the subconscious of his personality being betrayed. Prospero purposefully mocks Ferdinand in front of Miranda, which echoes this idea of 'putting him in his place' and remaining and stating his dominance in his daughter's mind. Similarly, although this must not be overstated, the scene the scene with Ferdinand's sword and Prospero's wand seem to be some type of mach, phallic symbols of male conflict. Prospero gets specifically angry when Ferdinand ignores him, as reflected by 'one more word' and 'I charge thee, that thou attend me'. Also Prospero gets angry when

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