How Social Media Affected The Mayor Of London 's Election

1995 WordsJan 22, 20178 Pages
OEL067 Advanced English for Masters Studies Essay How Social Media Affected the Mayor of London 's Election. Saad Kakouli 15018140 Social Media has significantly increased in the past couple of years, with the development of multiple platforms increasing the connectivity between people. It has integrated a new way of communicating through mobile devices without any barriers, allowing people to be continuously connecting with each other. Social media has a tremendous impact on individual and organisational decision making. Furthermore, social media websites have played an essential role in various elections around the world. This essay will highlight the most important points on how social media affected…show more content…
As shown in Figure 1 and Figure 2, it is the most used platform around the world, while Twitter is ranked second in the world according to Alexa. In the United Kingdom, Twitter is the second most used platform (Cosenza, 2016). The population of the United Kingdom is 64.1 million, with 89% of UK residents being active Internet users. The total number of social media users is 38 million, with 50% of the entire population access social media platforms via mobile phones. Furthermore, there has been a 4% growth in the number of active Internet users and a 6% growth in the number of active social media users. In addition, the number of users who access social media platforms via their mobile devices has increased by 7% (Think Digital First, 2016). The efficiency of Twitter as a social media platform has been noticeable, as it remarkably affected the Mayoral election results than any other platform, including Facebook and Instagram. By a simple feature offered by Twitter that can enable voters to engage with the candidate through direct messaging, mentions and hashtags, Twitter excelled in influencing the decision of the electors by real-time interaction rather than just reading about the Candidates and their activities. As described in the book Twitter and Society in 2014 by
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