How The Black Death Influenced Life

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Explain how the Black Death influenced life in Europe The Black Death had a significant negative effect on both the economy of Europe and the Catholic Church during and after it 's prime, proving to ruin the lives of many both directly and indirectly subject to the plague. However, it can be argued that the Black Death prompted a restructure in feudalism, increasing equality in society. The Bubonic Plague became prominent in 1347 AD, tearing through the lives of many throughout Europe. A major financial shift in the fourteenth century saw millions living in poverty. The Catholic Church was shunned because it had no power over the plague, and therefore lost much of its influence on society. However, lower class citizens were able to stand…show more content…
Consequently prices rose dramatically, stabilising for a long period of very high rates." Braginsky highlights the difficulty for peasants and land owners alike during the time of the Bubonic Plague. It can be observed that there was strife in the European community, having to deal with inflation of food prices, causing victims of the plague to often not be well nourished, leading to more deaths. Henry Knighton, an English monk, once wrote that “all essentials are so expensive that something which had previously cost one quid, was now worth four or five quid”. It is obvious that many were negatively effected by this inflation, which was caused primarily because of the decrease in the population due to the Black Death. Another reason for the worsening of Europe 's economy was that the trade business was hit hard and those dependant on the trade business lost substantial amounts of money. As it came to the realisation that trading with people from plague ravaged areas transported the disease, no one wanted to continue trading. It was also because of the major decrease in population that trade became less prominent. This is as a result of the people alive having to work in their own area (often in agriculture) to support themselves. A notary from Piacenza, Gabriele de Mussi ' gave a vivid account of the spreading of the plague.
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