How do William Blake and William Wordsworth respond to nature in their

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How do William Blake and William Wordsworth respond to nature in their poetry? The Romantic Era was an age, which opened during the Industrial
(1800-1900) and French Revolution (1789). These ages affected the romantic poets greatly by disrupting and polluting nature. Before the
Industrial Revolution, William Blake wrote about Songs of Innocence.
He also wrote Songs of Experience but after the Industrial
Revolution. William Wordsworth, on the other hand, continued on an optimistic route and ignored the Industrial Revolution in his poems.
He instead wrote about nature only and its beauty. Previous Augustan poets were more controlled and rule governed. They were also concerned with order.

In Blake’s ‘London’, he describes the
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Wordsworth talks about the mind being free and relaxed, “Ne’er saw I, never felt, a calm so deep!” The adjective
‘deep’ shows how immense the tranquility is. It also shows how the poem is personal, “Ne’er saw I.” He sets the scene in the morning, creating a feeling of calmness and peace, “The beauty of the morning; silent, bare.” The noun ‘beauty’ implies splendor and magnificence, showing the opposite of what Blake writes about ‘London’. The adjective ‘silent’ is also the opposite of what Blake writes in
‘London’, “How the youthful Harlot’s curse”. Wordsworth mentions the daffodils as people, “When all at once I saw a crowd.” Similarly, he uses personification, ‘crowd’, to imply that everyone is unified in nature. He uses color in his poem to indicate a deeper meaning, “A host, of golden daffodils.” The adjective “golden” illustrates purity as well, therefore connecting it to innocence. The noun ‘host’ has a slight religious tone, which also relates to purity. ‘The Daffodils’ has eight syllables in each line. This makes the poem seem more complex than ‘Spring’.

In ‘Spring’, a lively tone is repeated throughout the poem,”Merrily, merrily we welcome in the year.” The adverb ‘merrily’ is repeated to highlight the positive tone of the poem and to make it last longer.
The pronoun ‘we welcome in the year’ also shows us how everyone is unified in nature. Blake uses colour to expand the meaning of the sentence, “Come and

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