How do the poets represent the importance of 'roots' in their poetry?

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How do the poets represent the importance of 'roots' in their poetry?
Consider how the social and cultural identity of the poets is paramount to the development of the main themes.

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How do the poets represent the importance of 'roots' in their poetry?
Consider how the social and cultural identity of the poets is paramount to the development of the main themes.

The four poems that I will be comparing all describe how the poets feel about their roots, background and cultural heritage. Although they are all based on the same issue, they have many different features that are quite different.

John Agard is the author of 'Half-Caste'. He was born in Guyana and then moved to Britain in 1977. In
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She wants to stay true to her origins but wants to have a normal English life like the people around her. Moniza Alvi once said,

"Growing up I felt that my origins were invisible, because there weren't many people to identify with in Hatfield at that time, of a mixed race background or indeed from any other race, so I felt there was a bit of a blank drawn over that. I think I had a fairly typical
English fifties sixties upbringing".

Isolation is specifically included in all the four poems. The poets all feel isolated because of their language and cultural differences to their surroundings.

The poet in 'Half-Caste' is not taken seriously by the people around him and he feels as though they are labelling him. This can feel isolated because his neighbours are different to him. Throughout the poem he uses quotes such as,

'I dream half-a-dream' and

'I cast half-a-shadow'.

By using these phrases he is saying that by discriminating him and calling him half-caste, they are taking away half of his identity. By describing personal features that nobody can change such as his shadow in this way, he makes you realise that just by calling him one name can hurt him in such a severe way.

In 'Search For My Tongue' this feeling of isolation is also present, but is expressed in a somewhat different way. The poet
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