How does Miller use the ending of each act to make the audience feel the madness in Salem?

1429 WordsOct 22, 20146 Pages
How does Miller use the ending of each act to make the audience feel the madness in Salem? Miller is able to portray the madness of Salem in a variety of ways, throughout the whole of the play however the ending of each act allows the audience to fully feel the hysteria. By incorporating changes of key themes and ideas as well as using links throughout the text and a variety of dramatic techniques towards the end of each act, Miller is able to leave the audience with a sense of this madness. The ways in which he reflects the madness change from scene to scene however each technique is just as important as others. Occurring frequently throughout the play, but particularly predominant at the end of Act I is the use of stage directions to…show more content…
Miller utilises Mary Warren's repeated refrain of "I cannot, I cannot" to reflect how crazy she has become. Despite Abigail's wrongdoings Mary states that she "cannot charge murder on Abigail" which shows how much Abigail has manipulated her. She then states that "they'll turn on [her]" which demonstrates the pressure placed upon Mary to lie to the court. Mary's mind has been twisted into believing that staying loyal to the girls is more important than saving the lives of innocent people accused of witchcraft and this gives the audience a glimpse of the absurd ideas implanted into the brains of the Salem community. The curtain falls on Mary repeatedly sobbing "I cannot, I cannot" and this tells the audience that the madness is not at an end but will continue into the scenes to come. In Act III, Miller utilises Mary Warren's change of heart to fully epitomise the extent of which the madness in Salem has grown. As previously stated, Miller used the end of Act II to show that the madness in Salem would continue into the coming scenes, and by making Mary Warren and John Proctor the subject of drama once again he has shown this. The end of Act III begins with Abigail conversing with an invisible bird which is acclaimed to be controlled by Mary Warren. This, not unlike most other claims of witchcraft in the play, has no

More about How does Miller use the ending of each act to make the audience feel the madness in Salem?

Open Document