How the Negative and Positive Impacts of Love Are Explored Using Various Main Characters in the Play ‘Much Ado About Nothing’

5155 WordsMay 16, 201321 Pages
The negative and positive impacts of love are explored using various main characters in the play ‘Much ado About Nothing’. The play was written by Shakespeare in the Elizabethan era and therefore love was portrayed in a very different way, they would have seen a woman as less important in a relationship; in this era however we have very different views and see both genders as equal. Consequently as the play progresses the Elizabethan audience would relate a lot more to the courtly love that Hero and Claudio comprise. The more unconventional relationship between Beatrice and Benedick may relate more to the relationships in this day and age. The strongest bond of love is between Beatrice and Benedick due to their cerebral relationship, a…show more content…
This idea of being cheated on and experiencing a negative impact of love is similar to an idea the poem ‘Ballad’ when it says ‘He has two hearts and I have none’. Beatrice says ‘a double heart for his single one’. Both of these women had their heart stolen by a man that they thought loved them, they gave away their hearts but did not get anything in return; Beatrice now has a bitter attitude towards both Benedick and love in general. She is also however independent enough to fight her own battles. The second semantic field she uses is about war and fighting. First of all she lacks confidence that he was any help in the war, expressed by the quotes: ‘I pray you, how many hath he killed and eaten in theses wars? But how many hath he killed?’ and ‘what is he to a lord?’ These propose that she thinks he is worthless to the Prince and to the war. She mocks him and says ‘he is a very valiant trencherman’ just because he has a strong stomach and can eat anything. She continues to wound him with insults at the masked ball where she says Benedick is ‘the prince’s jester, a very dull fool’. She does not want to be seen as less important just because she is a woman, she expresses her views blatantly. An Elizabethan audience would have seen this as very unusual and un-ladylike for a woman, she is not the typical quiet and modest person that she may have been expected to be considering she had an uncle of quite a high
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