How the Relation of the Camera to the Real is Problematized in The Thin Blue Line and Yuki Yukite Shingun

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How the Relation of the Camera to the Real is Problematized in “The Thin Blue Line” and “Yuki Yukite Shingun” Documentary films can include every type of discourse about the real world. The accomplishments of nonfiction film are derived from more than the stereotypical edited interview segment, and recently have been a totality that is useful as much for showing reality as it is for expressing the creative visions of its director. It is possible for the most extrinsic implications to be presented in a way that reflects individual systemics and personal expression. The innovation of a nonfiction work can legitimize many techniques that were previously unused and will ultimately provide countless new ways of exploring social and…show more content…
This contributes to the rhetorical (sometimes even allegorical) intensity and the style of Morris. As he has said, “There’s no reason why documentaries can’t be as personal as fiction filmmaking and bear the imprint of those who made them. Truth isn’t guaranteed by style or expression. It isn’t guaranteed by anything.” (Bruzzi, 1-10) Yuki Yukite Shingun, or God’s Naked Army Marches On, was directed by Kazuo Hara in 1988. The story revolves around Okuzaki Kenzo, a Japanese veteran of the Pacific War (particularly in New Guinea) who seeks past officers to take responsibility for atrocities committed 40 years ago and acknowledge the truth of war. When the living relatives of the victims of these atrocities no longer accompany Okuzaki, he takes the ultimate step to confuse the camera’s world with reality by having actor’s play those roles during his sometimesviolent interviews. Furthermore, the relation of the camera to the real is problematized by the awareness of the camera that is inherent in this type of interviewing. The theories of Roland Barthes, a leading 20th century social and literary critic, are the basis for the dilemma posed by the possible conflicts of the camera and what is real. He explains the photograph as something that “always carries its referent with itself.” He goes on to say that because of this relationship, the image is a constant reminder

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