How we came to know what we know now about anatomy and physiology has always been a great curiosity

1000 Words4 Pages
How we came to know what we know now about anatomy and physiology has always been a great curiosity of anyone interested in the medical field. Knowing the history can lead to even more discoveries in the future. When you think of anatomy you imagine something like this picture below. But here is where it all began…. The beginning of anatomy and physiology, ironically, began with a curiosity in biology. The first man to create an important contribution to biology was Alcmaeon, in the 5th century, BC. He was the first scientist to have worked with dissection. His focus was in trying to find out from where and how human intelligence came to be. His research never intended to be anatomical. He merely stumbled upon anatomical research.…show more content…
He is famous for his dissection of apes and pigs, it is said he never once dissected a human cadaver. He believed apes were anatomically identical to humans. His work was never questioned until 100’s of years later when, Vesalius, a Renaissance anatomist showed people the difference between apes and humans. He discovered more than 200 differences. In 1540, Vesalius showed exactly what Galen was wrong about. Galen’s work was much respected regardless. He got a lot right, but also a fair amount wrong . For example, he stated that apes had hearts with 3 ventricles, as did humans. During the Renaissance era, slicing open human cadavers was approved by many people, but unfortunately a lot of professors bypassed the idea. Vesalius was a very dedicated man. He did dissect criminals, but he also managed to snatch the bodies himself. Based on his research, Vesalius created a very detailed book called De Humani Corporis Fabrica.(The Structure of the Human Body). This was the most famous anatomy book of that era. Just like Galen, Hippocrates never once dissected a human cadaver. He stated that “dissection was unpleasant if not cruel,” as stated on page 53 of the book Stiff by Mary Roach. Hippocrates believed tendons to be nerves and believed the brain was a mucous secreting gland. Hippocrates was dubbed the Father of Medicine. In 1489 to 1515, Leonardo da Vinci, began to illustrate anatomical features. He is ordered to stop dissecting in 1515 by

More about How we came to know what we know now about anatomy and physiology has always been a great curiosity

Open Document