Howard Gardner 's Theory Of Multiple Intelligences

1466 WordsMay 25, 20166 Pages
Ignacio Estrada, Director of the Gordon and Betty Moore Foundation, once said “If a child can 't learn the way we teach, maybe we should teach the way they learn”. Psychologist Howard Gardner’s research and theories embody Estrada’s quote. Gardner’s works as a developmental and cognitive psychologist have impacted the way children are taught in their early childhood. His findings are focused on how humans think and how they learn in different ways. Howard Gardner is considered one of the most influential psychologists of the 20th and 21st centuries because of his cognitive and developmental research, most particularly his theory of Multiple Intelligences. Howard Gardner was born on July 11, 1943 in the small coal-mining town of Scranton, Pennsylvania. His parents Ralph and Gilde Gardner were both German-Jewish refugees who escaped Hitler and the Nazi regime prior to World War II. Gardner was a very studious youth and an aspiring pianist. Education was stressed mightily in the Gardner home and Howard lived up to that standard, consistently excelling in school throughout his childhood and high school years. He enrolled in Harvard College in 1960, where he originally believed that law would be his calling. Gardner considered himself to be, “the proverbial Jewish boy who hated the sight of blood, and was destined to become a lawyer” (Gardner, 2011b, p. 1). While at college, however, Gardner found himself mesmerized by the human mind and therefore switched his course of study
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