Hudson River: a Detailed and Comprehensive Geological History

6373 WordsMay 1, 201326 Pages
Contents Introduction………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………..2 Hudson River Formation……………………………………………………………………………………………………………..5 Hudson Canyon…………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………12 Glacial History…………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………..14 Conclusion…………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………17 Bibliography………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………18 Maps & Diagrams…..………………………………………………………………………………………………………………….19 Hudson Canyon……………………………………………………………………………………………………………..19 Geological Processes……………………………………………………………………………………………………….22 1|Page Introduction In 1872, a naturalist and surveyor by the name of Verplanck Colvin found the source of the Hudson River. It is a small pond on the south…show more content…
Over millions of years, these have contributed to building up many islands including Staten Island, Hoffman Island, Swinburne Island and many others. The very low slope of the Hudson plays a great role in the amount of discharge and island buildup, too, as it only rises about 0.24 inches per mile for the last 150 miles of the rivers path. To give some perspective, the Mississippi river rises approximately 6 inches per mile during its course, and discharges about 700 million tons of sediment per year into the Gulf of Mexico 2 Coarse cobble point bars are essentially pointed cobble that has been piled into bar like formations. These formations are generally formed when sediments carrying cobble leave it behind. 3 Ground formed into a steep slope as part of fortification. 4 “Moraine” is a word used to describe the earth, stones and debris a glacier deposits. “Terminal” describes that these items were deposited where the glaciers maximum extent was, in this case Long Island. 3|Page and its mouth is approximately a ½-mile wide. The Hudson River discharges about 175 million tons of sediment per year and its mouth is about the same width at a ½ mile. With a 2 inch increase in slope geologists predict the discharge rate of the Hudson would spike up to about 450 million tons per year and the
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