Human Control And Its Effects On Modern Society

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History is the sum of the events that result from human control going well or bad. Myriad times in history have there been instances where control or power has been given to a person and their control is beneficial or detrimental to a society. In The Early History of Rome, author and historian Livy writes how human control has played out in Roman civilization, one of the most influential societies of Western civilization. By writing this vivid history, Livy demonstrates that when human control is given, the best outcomes result when humans act selflessly instead of selfishly. According to Livy, therefore, historical knowledge helps us develop a more collectivistic view of our modern society in order to maintain morality in them. The story…show more content…
One could argue that his troops were the ones who directly attacked the Etruscans, but if it weren’t for Cocles’ assist in keeping them from advancing, the troops wouldn’t have been inspired enough to fight. In this situation, no one else but Cocles’ self-sacrificing actions were out of pure courage to protect the people and troops of the Janiculum as a whole. Just as the unknown, Chinese man defended himself and others by blocking a line of army tanks in their path during the Tiananmen Protests in 1989, Clocles’ courage was genuine and unselfish. In both of these instances, morality overpowered dangerous consequences and circumstances and created a positive outcome. His collectivistic actions were significant enough for Livy to write about. Just as Horatius Cocles displayed a great amount of courage and selflessness for others, Cloelia, a hostage in captivity of the Etruscans, also showed much courage and leadership. Leading a group of other female hostages along with her, she passed the Etruscan guards, and swam her way across the Tiber River to return her fellow hostages to the Roman side. What is unique about Cloelia’s brave actions, “unprecedented in a woman, by an equally unprecedented honour”, was the reaction her escape had on Porsena, who ended up admiring her courage (Livy, 124). Cloelia could have easily ignored her desire to try to
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