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Human Nature In William Golding's Lord Of The Flies

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“Which is better? To have laws and agree or to hunt and kill?” (208). The question of whether humans should be controlled by a government or left to fend for themselves is a question that has been asked for centuries. In the novel, Lord of the Flies, author William Golding uses the Freudian concepts in order to demonstrate the inevitable failure of a government when attempting to control human nature. Sigmund Freud’s concepts of id, ego, and superego work to shape Golding’s novel and the reader’s view on human nature. Golding uses Freudian theories to prove that a direct democracy will inevitably fail due to the fact that human nature cannot be suppressed by rules, self-control, or societal norms. Golding uses the concept of id to…show more content…
He rushed out of the undergrowth” (52). The id which is associated with uncontrollable desires, wants, and needs reverts the human mind back to its primordial state without laws or systems of government. The human mind at this time was controlled purely by instinct and a drive for survival. This old need and want driven state of mind is enticing to the young boys who so desperately feel a need to break from the iron clad grip of their parents that when given the opportunity regress towards a simple mind without second thoughts. This mentality is “seductive” to the children and as Jack “rushes” from the undergrowth immediately after hearing the pig, his do but don’t think attitude is highlighted. In a direct democracy, each person has their say and doing without thinking is detrimental due to the fact that a decision must be made by the group before any actions can be made. Therefore the boys reject the leadership as they are forced to do things that they do not want to do and must think not just for themselves but for the sake of others also. The rejection of rules and leadership is caused by the boy’s id driven uncontrollable desire seeking and necessity for instant gratification. Using the idea of ego Golding shows that although the boys may attempt to
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