'I Am a Man More Sinned Against Than Sinning'. to What Extent Does the Character King Lear Suffer Out of All Proportions to His Initial Transgressions?

1503 Words Mar 11th, 2013 7 Pages
'I am a man more sinned against than sinning'. To what extent does the character King Lear suffer out of all proportions to his initial transgressions?

There would be two different opinions on whether or not King Lear deserved what had happened to him. First, I think I should mention the ways that King Lear suffered.
There were evident levels of emotional and physical suffering. From an emotional perspective, Lear discovers that he is hated by his own daughters, which would be a terrible experience for a father. Not only is Lear hated by Goneril and Regan, they are also plotting to kill him. This would be emotionally damaging for any father.
Also from a physical perspective, Lear gets kicked out of his kingdom to live in what is referred
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This could also be compared to Lear's initial transgressions of quantifying love. Lear may be hoping that by telling Regan how much he loves her, she will give him what he wants, similar to the way that when Regan told Lear how much she loved him, she got what she wanted. Unfortunately, Lear got quite the opposite and the proposition of his departure was evident still. This shows that perhaps Lear is getting far worse than he deserves, in comparison to his original transgression of quantifying love for a positive outcome. And even after this has happened, the scene continues to go on, and Lear discovers that his servant (who is really Kent in disguise) has been put in the stocks for fighting with Oswald, Goneril's servant. This shows Lear's loss of power very well, saying that his servants are worth less than Goneril's servants.
Later on in this same scene, Lear makes a famous comment which was 'I gave you all...' The idea that he gave his daughters everything is a negative thing for a start. Giving away all you possessions is obviously not good, because then you have nothing left. Although, Lear was saying it as if to say, 'I gave you all I had, couldn't you return the favour?' His transgression here is giving his daughters everything, but his suffering was not receiving anything in return. In this case, his Karma would be neutral, seeing as he gave away anything, what right does he have to have anything?
King Lear would get kicked out shortly

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