Immigration Policies During Mexican Immigration Across The Border From The Mid 20th Century Into The 21st Century

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To what extent have United States immigration policies contributed to the fluctuating trends in Mexican immigration across the border from the mid-20th century into the 21st century? Alejandra Estrada Professor Sarah Lischer POL 251 To what extent have United States immigration policies contributed to the fluctuating trends in Mexican immigration across the border from the mid-20th century into the 21st century? This report is centralized around two main arguments. The first argument accounts for the ineffectiveness of the United States’ original 20th century Immigration and Nationality Acts and work programs for Mexican migrants, as they contributed to the gradual rise in Mexican immigration trends from the…show more content…
From this, an examination of the Second Wave of Mexican Migration reveals the amendments and the reforms over the control of the original Acts from 1970-1990. Then, the effects of the new acts of the 1990s initiate Third Wave of Mexican Immigration Followed by the Reverse Wave of the 2000s, which represents a shift in US immigration policy post 9/11, exhibiting its ability to control the border and initiate immigration decline. Why is this significant? It is of great importance to consider the effect that a nation’s immigration polices can have on another nation and the direct impacts that its citizens can endure as temporary citizens of in a nation that is not their country of origin. In order to improve the US immigration system, the effects on the nation’s largest immigrant population will be examined to come to terms with the policies that proves successful and those that were ineffective to prevent them from impacting future immigrants. First Wave of Mexican Immigration: The Origins of the 20th Century Immigration Acts Bracero Program (1942) Before the 1950’s, the number of Mexican immigrants into the US had never surpassed 500,000 on a yearly basis while their share in the scheme of the total US immigrant population remained below 5%. After the 1950’s, Mexican immigrants became the largest immigrant population entering the US with their
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