Impacts of Culture on Human Behavior

2342 Words Mar 6th, 2011 10 Pages
People within organizations vary in terms of culture, values and behavior and age gaps. With these intrinsic individual differences it is a challenge for managers/supervisors how to manage motivating these employees in terms of their differences. Many contemporary authors have defined the concept of motivation. Motivation has been defined as: the psychological process that gives behavior purpose and direction (Kreitner, 1995); a predisposition to behave in a purposive manner to achieve specific, unmet needs (Buford, Bedeian, & Lindner, 1995); an internal drive to satisfy an unsatisfied need (Higgins, 1994); and the will to achieve (Bedeian, 1993). Motivation is defined as a human psychological characteristic. It includes the factors that …show more content…
Other people like to fill their time with activity. Some workers like change, challenge, and diverse problems to solve. Whatever individual’s personal reasons for working, the bottom line, however, is that almost everyone works for money. Whatever you call it: compensation, salary, bonuses, benefits or remuneration, money pays the bills. Money provides housing, gives children clothing and food, sends teens to college, and allows leisure activities, and eventually, retirement. To underplay the importance of money and benefits to people who work is a mistake.
Fair benefits and pay is the cornerstone of a successful company that recruits and retains committed workers. If you provide a living wage for your employees, you can then work on motivational issues. Without the fair, living wage, however, you risk losing your best people to a better-paying employer.
In fact, recent research from Watson Wyatt Worldwide in The Human Capital Edge: 21 People Management Practices Your Company Must Implement (or Avoid) to Maximize Shareholder Value, recommends that to attract the best employees, you need to pay more than your average-paying counterparts in the marketplace.
In the surveys and studies dating back to the early 1980s that demonstrate people want more from work than money. An early study of thousands of workers and managers by the American Psychological Association clearly demonstrated this. While managers