Importance Of Grit

1354 WordsDec 5, 20176 Pages
Grit: Should it be taught in schools? Grit is, most likely, an attribute we all strive for. It is a trait we usually place on people that we look up to, such as athletes, role models, doctors, surgeons, and even book or movie characters. We tend to see these people as having accomplished much in their lives, and that is what we strive for. Grit can be defined in the dictionary as “strength of character.” The definition, itself, is easy to understand and could definitely be taught in schools. However, grit, as a characteristic, is not something that can be taught. It is one that the student must learn to develop on their own. Countless numbers of people have taken predictions about what might make a child more gritty. Much advice from…show more content…
She eventually determined that grit is a solitary characteristic that we, as a society, use to consider one’s success. Over the years she has tested multiple differing groups of people with her Grit Scale and came to the conclusion that a majority of the most successful people are “resilient and persevering”, thus, obtaining grit (Denby 3). The studies done by Duckworth, as well as other psychologists, have caused a question to arise: “should grit be taught in schools?” Duckworth was actually working in a school when she initially changed her perspective of the keys to success. She came to the conclusion that her hardest working students surpassed her more naturally gifted ones (Denby 7). Her work with various education advocates has seized grit as a “quality that can be located and developed in children” (Denby 3). Because of this, some public schools are currently modifying their curriculum in order to teach grit character. In California, there are schools that have even begun grading and evaluating students on their level of grit. Even the standardized testing companies that issue the National Assessment of Educational Progress and the Program for International Student Assessment are advancing toward the inclusion of character analysis as a record of student success (Denby 3). However, these education reformers have soon realized the ugly truth that we, as a society,
Open Document