Importance of Understanding Civil-Military Relations

1610 Words Sep 28th, 2010 7 Pages
The Importance of Understanding
Civil-Military Relations
“Some folks are born made to wave the flag, Ooh, they’re red, white and blue…
And when the band plays hail to the chief, Ooh, they point the cannon at you, lord…
It aint me, it aint me, I aint no senators son, son… It aint me, it aint me; I aint no fortunate one, no…
Some folks inherit star spangled eyes, Ooh, they send you down to war, lord…
And when you ask them, how much should we give? Ooh, they only answer more! More! More! Yoh…
It aint me, it aint me, I aint no military son, son. It aint me, it aint me; I aint no fortunate one, one…”
- Fortunate Son”, Creedence Clearwater Revival, 1969 The above lyrics are from the song “Fortunate Son” by Creedence Clearwater
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This disconnect between military and civilians causes distrust and divides America, which further threatens the safety of our nations. We are just helping our enemies weaken our government when our leaders work independently against each other instead of working together professionally through differences. They must cooperate with each other and sometimes “agree to disagree”. “The divide between society and the military places civilian leaders at a disadvantage, alienates the public, and weakens the military’s ability to protect American interests at home and abroad”. [4] If our Military leaders can become better educated themselves on Civil-Military matters they can, in turn, help reconnect and educate the public. This would result in better utilization of our forces by the civilian leaders. Another perceived problem is the number of Congress members who have served in the military is much lower than the past. This is increasing “the Gap” between Civilians and Military even more. For example, in 1975 approximately 72 percent of the U.S. Congress had military experience. In 2003, the number of U.S. congressional officials with prior military service was approximately 30 percent. By 2007, the number declined further to 24 percent, with 23 percent in the U.S. Senate and 29 percent in House of Representatives.[5] The Military must find new and creative ways to educate representative’s of the public and work
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