In Intro to Ethics, we have discussed each moral theory in the context of how the theories dealt

1000 WordsApr 23, 20194 Pages
In Intro to Ethics, we have discussed each moral theory in the context of how the theories dealt with the theory of right conduct and with the deontic status the action had. When we looked at how each theory we talked about dealt with deontic status, we looked at how the actions were right or wrong. The main theories we looked at this semester that dealt with right conduct were utilitarianism, Kant’s moral theory, and virtue ethics. Although each of these moral theories has its own flaws, I believe that Kant’s moral theory is the strongest and most superior out of all the moral theories. The first moral theory studied in the course this semester was classical utilitarianism. Utilitarianism at its base argument is the attempt to maximize…show more content…
Virtue ethics does not deal with which action is wrong or which action is right. It deals with the character of person. Virtue ethics promotes the idea of a person bettering themselves by striving to be a good person. . Virtue ethics deals with happiness by proposing that a certain character would bring that person the most happiness. Virtue ethics is when a person knowing what the right thing is and having the want to do that right action. Aristotle used virtue ethics to try to reach Eudemonia. Eudemonia is when a person strives to reach or reaches the highest level of happiness a certain charter can reach. When a person is trying to reach this state of happiness or Eudemonia, that person does actions that help develop his/her character. An example of this is a person with no need to study for test other than the fact that doing well on the test would bring personal happiness. The final moral theory that we discussed this was Kant’s moral theory. Kant’s moral theory is the most superior. Kant’s moral deals with the categorical imperative. Kant believed in treating all things equally and never as a mean’s to one’s end. Kant’s first maxim is the universal law which is the categorical imperative. This says that you should only do something if it is ok for everyone else to do that action. An example of the universal maximum is would be present in a case of infidelity. A man who finds his best friend’s wife attractive could have sexual relations with his friend’s

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