In Pride and Prejudice, Jane Austen’s usage of letters allows the reader

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In Pride and Prejudice, Jane Austen’s usage of letters allows the reader to fully comprehend the situation and certain feelings of the characters.

The Usage of Jane’s Letters in Pride and Prejudice

In Pride and Prejudice, Jane Austen’s usage of letters allows the reader to fully comprehend the situation and certain feelings of the characters. For example, the two letters sent by Jane Bennet to
Elizabeth Bennet in Chapter 46 allow the novel to arrive at a turning point in many different aspects. The obvious purpose of the written letters is to inform the reader of the events at hand regarding Lydia
Bennet and Mr. Wickham. However, these letters allow changes to take place in other relationships as well.

Jane Bennet
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Wickham as well as Elizabeth and
Mr. Darcy.

However the seriousness of the situation in itself, the relationship between Mr. Darcy and Elizabeth Bennet is furthermore developed because of these two letters. Elizabeth turns to Mr. Darcy as soon as he appears and immediately notifies him of everything. This action of hers illustrates the budding closeness between the two and how she relies on Darcy. Both Elizabeth and Mr. Darcy blame themselves for not exposing Mr. Wickham as the vagrant that he truly is. Therefore, this shared guilt provides the nascent couple with a strong emotional connection and a universal principle. A major factor of a couple’s relationship is how they react in times of distress. Do they turn to each other for support or withdraw from one another? Elizabeth’s reliance on Mr. Darcy is a foreshadowing of a wonderful relationship to come for the couple. The two letters alone are a catalyst in exposing these emotions that might otherwise be suppressed. The two letters will generally contribute to furthering the development of
Elizabeth and Mr. Darcy’s relationship.

Perhaps the reasoning behind Lydia’s actions could be her family and their attitudes toward certain subjects such as men, romance, and marriage. Mrs. Bennet is consistently pressuring her daughters to become married women in order to ensure social status and financial security for the remainder of their lives. It seems that her only goal in life is