Incarceration Within The Federal Bureau Of Prisons

1195 WordsFeb 1, 20165 Pages
Over the past forty years the increased of mass incarceration within the Federal Bureau of Prisons has increased more than 700 percent since the 1970’s, between the different type of ethnicity. Billions of dollars have spent to house offenders and to maintain their everyday life from rehabilitation programs, academic education, vocational training, substance abuse programs and medical care. The cost of incarceration climbs according to the level of security based on violent and non-violent crimes. Fewer staff is required in minimum and medium-security prisons that house low-level offenders. Incarceration is likely to serves as one indicator of other co-occurring risks and vulnerabilities that makes families particularly fragile. Mass incarceration is likely to increase if awareness is not implicated to reduce the rate of imprisonment and broken families to take back their communities and reclaim their hope for the future. Thesis Statement There are many offenders within the criminal justice system, the political economy of the prison crisis in America has increased over the years which creates a questions on the way "dollars & sense" works. With a nation of fewer crimes, prison population will diminish, but does that deter our political system to have taxpayers contribute less to the way prison systems are tracked? Introduction There are many offenders within the criminal justice system, the political economy of the prison crisis in America has
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