Incidents In The Life Of A Slave Girl Essay

1552 Words7 Pages
Slavery and Christianity in the Life of Black Girl Cristal Ramirez John Jay College African Literature 223 Dr. Endsley September 27, 2017 Harriet Jacobs, in her book “Incidents in the Life of a Slave Girl”, narrates the real life and experiences lived by a black girl who born as a slave. In this book, Jacobs shows slavery as something that violates all the rights and principles from the blacks. The way this book is written makes the story more believable. The purpose of Jacobs was to make credible what she has written about the slaves at that time. The author used stories from real slaves and examples so her audiences, white people from the Northern, have knowledge of what black slaves were going…show more content…
But for no one is a secret that for black people religion has always played an important role in many aspects of their lives, hope and faith were something that had them standing during those bad times. Rev. Mr. Pike is a perfect example to show the hypocrisy of the church that was seen in those times. “Servants, be obedient to them that are your masters according to the flesh, with fear and trembling, in singleness of your heart, as unto Christ” (Jacobs, 59). This man plays an important role because he became the one who creates sermon for the black people giving them hope. In other words, what white people were trying to do by using the religion as a guide was to how black people that they were inferior to the white people. In chapter XXXV, Linda shows the prejudices that were seen even in the states that claimed to be free states, which meant that they did not use the black people as a slave, but nevertheless, there were many prejudices encountered by people of color. Linda herself experienced such ill-treatment from the hands of color people from the free state. Linda in this chapter told her experience of how she was disinclined to her right to sit down to dinner with other people, light and dark skin color. “I was no sooner seated, then a gruff voice, “Get Up! You know you are not allowed to sit there.” I looked up, and, to my astonishment and indignation, saw that the
Open Document