Integrating Women into the World Economy Essay

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Integrating Women into the World Economy

Introduction

On November 9, 1989, the world’s economy changed dramatically. The fall of the Berlin wall produced a new world order which enabled states to connect on political, economic, and social levels with nations that were previously inaccessible to the western world. This created an interaction across national boundaries. The past two decades have seen the growing economic interdependence of countries worldwide, including an increased volume of cross-border transactions of goods and services, international capital flows, and most importantly, the rapid and widespread diffusion of technology (“Economic and Social Survey of Asia and the Pacific, 1999”). The airplane hijackings in
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This has contributed to a disparity in gender equality in the economic sector, as most opportunities for women have been severely overlooked. The United Nations, recognizing this, is committed to decreasing the gap between gender developments. The Economic and Financial Committee has declared the topic of women and development to be revisited and revised by the General Assembly on an annual basis. The issue of globalization and development is one of many agenda topics, however, and gender development is all encompassing, as it includes sectors at the regional and local levels.

One of the most groundbreaking developments on the topic, the special session entitled "Women 2000: Gender Equality, Development and Peace for the Twenty-First Century" was recommended by GA resolution 52/100 and was designed to review the Beijing Declaration and Platform for Action (“Beijing +5 Process and Beyond”). Paragraph 156 of the 1995 Beijing Platform for Action states:

"For the majority of women ...continuing obstacles have hindered their ability to achieve economic autonomy and to ensure sustainable livelihoods for themselves and their dependants. Women are active in a variety of economic areas, which they often combine, ranging from wage labor and subsistence farming and fishing, to the informal sector. However, legal and customary barriers to ownership of or means of access to land, natural…