Intercultural Communication

21031 Words Jan 16th, 2012 85 Pages
I. INTERCULTURAL COMMUNICATION. FRAMEWORK

"...the single greatest barrier to business success is the one erected by culture." Edward T. Hall and Mildred Reed Hall
Why study Intercultural Communication?
Cultural diversity and multiculturalism are the realities of everyday life for almost everyone. The growth of interdependence of people and cultures in the global society of the twenty-first century has forced us to pay more attention to intercultural issues. In order to live and function in this multicultural environment as effectively and meaningfully as possible, people must be competent in intercultural communication. Therefore, demands for intercultural communication skills are increasing as more and more businesses go
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Being aware of intercultural issues, understanding and appreciating intercultural differences ultimately promotes clearer communication, breaks down barriers, builds trust, strengthens relationships, opens horizons and yields tangible results in terms of business success. (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Intercultural_communication) http://www.kwintessential.co.uk/cultural-services/articles/introduction-intercultural.html A Short History of Intercultural Communication

1. A review of the development of intercultural communication study

Although the phenomenon of intercultural communication is as old as human society, the study of intercultural communication is of recent origin.

It was first started in the United States. Communication scholars commonly recognize E. T. Hall as the father of the field of intercultural communication study (Condon, 1981; Dodd, 1982; Gudykunst, 1985; Singer, 1987). He conceptualized this new field of ICC in the early 1950s when he worked for the U.S. Foreign Service Institute (FSI). He popularized this new area of communication in his book, The Silent Language, published in 1959, which is considered the founder of intercultural communication study and a classic in this field. Hall’s role in the study of IC is clearly pointed out by Gudykunst and Mody: “After World War II, the United States established a foreign aid program, the Marshall Plan, to help rebuild
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