Internalization And Philosophical Introspection In Dorothy Richardson's To The Lighthouse And The Lighthouse

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Internalization and Philosophical Introspection Contradictory to my previous rubric, the second rubric that I created is one which focuses on internalization, or more specifically, philosophical introspection. Introspection is another modernist literary quality that emerged after the start of World War I. The first war had a large impact on society and that particular generation at the time, as losses were large during the war, and grew even larger with the outbreak of influenza. To The Lighthouse by Virginia Woolf and The Tunnel by Dorothy Richardson both are included in this rubric. To The Lighthouse is entirely philosophical introspection and inner turmoil. The novel is narrated in third person omniscient, therefore we are not limited to one unreliable character to recount the story. Each character in the novel had a specific personal issue that was thought over in the text. Plot-wise, nothing happened in the novel except for the passing of time, a few deaths, and the war. All of which were spoken of using less than two sentences. Contrary to the previous rubric, this modernist novel was more focused on the intrapersonal connections of the characters and their inner dialogue instead of events. In The Tunnel, the reader is faced with a strong female protagonist who arguably has just as much philosophical introspection as the characters in To The Lighthouse. Richardson utilizes Miriam’s position in society to make a critique of how the modern woman at this time was

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