International Organizations

1664 Words Jun 22nd, 2018 7 Pages
According to Pease (2012), an international organization are conceived as formal institutions whose members are states and these are divided into two sub-groups called intergovernmental organizations (IGO) and non-governmental organizations (NGO). An IGO consists of states that voluntarily join, contribute financially, and assist in the decision making process. All of their members’ resolves, structures, and administrative protocols are clearly outlined in the treaty or charter. An example of an IGO is the North Atlantic Treaty Organization (NATO). First, all IGOs comes from an established government which can be further categorized by rules of membership which qualifies NATO because it is an alliance of about 30 members from North …show more content…
The first assumption is the state is the most important stakeholder in international relation meaning they have the final say within their governments. Actually, autonomy is based on capability which essentially means if the military and the money are present then the state is capable of ensuring final say. Another assumption, the state is a unitary and rational actor meaning they are composed of legislatures and bureaucracies which are integrated into one rational voice that speaks for the state. The benefits of this arrangement are that things are less complicated when each state is seen as one actor. This also allows analysts to see the big picture without having to deal with the small stuff. High politics dominates the international agenda is another assumption because security is the top priority of the states. Most realists have obtaining power as the number one strategy for ensuring national security therefore the states will participate in power exploiting conduct based on their political ability (Pease, 2012). Unlike idealists, realists rank human rights, environment, poverty and social status at the bottom of the priority pole which in my opinion makes a person wonder why put so much effort in protecting a country that does not support the
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