Interpersonal Attraction Rating Of A Social Stigma Associated With Different Loneliness States And Race

918 WordsJun 9, 20154 Pages
The goal of this study was to measure interpersonal attraction as a means of determining whether or not there was a social stigma associated with different loneliness states and race. The dependent variable in this study was the interpersonal attraction rating while the loneliness state and race were the independent variables. Both race and loneliness state had the potential to impact the interpersonal attraction rating of the characters. According to the results from this study, the null hypothesis had to be rejected. There was a significant difference between lonely and nonlonely states. The first alternate hypothesis predicted that lonely people would exhibit less interpersonal attraction than nonlonely people. This could be accepted. However, the second alternate hypothesis could not be accepted because there was no significant difference between Hispanic and White conditions, despite that the hypothesis predicted that Hispanics would be judged more harshly. The third and fourth alternate hypotheses, which predicted that the Hispanic condition would be less likeable in both loneliness states, could not be accepted based on the data of this study. By accepting the first alternate hypothesis, the researchers uphold the findings of Lau and Gruen (1992). Their data indicated that there was a greater social stigma associated with lonely people than nonlonely people. While Lau and Gruen (1992) found that the stigma interacted with gender, lonely women were judged more harshly

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