Interpersonal Sharing In America

1044 Words5 Pages
This interpersonal sharing lead to anime clubs appearing all over America, particularly on college campuses, (Animation, 1991). These clubs laid out the foundation for anime to once again take root in American culture, and with shows like Pokémon and Cowboy Bebop anime solidified its position as a permanent piece of American culture, (Ladd & Deneroff, 2009). In time, television networks picked back up in showing anime, albeit not during their normal children’s showtime, with segments such as Toonami on Cartoon Network, (Borrelli, 2002). Americans even started to produce adult oriented cartoons, such as South Park and Family Guy, thus taking after anime’s trends, (Ladd & Deneroff, 2009). Since the 1980s, anime’s popularity has just continued…show more content…
To give an example of how dōjinshi can be used as testing grounds, the famed artist and author CLAMP used to be what is known as a dōjinshi circle, a group of people that work together to make dōjinshi, (Wu, 2003). As a dōjinshi circle, their name was Clamp Cluster and they were comprised of eleven different members: Nanase Ohkawa, Mokona, Tsubaki Nekoi, Tsubaki Nekoi, O-Kyon, Sei Nanao, Tamayo Akiyama, Leeza Sei, Sōshi Hishika, Kazue Nakamori, and Shinya Ōmi, (Wu, 2003). When they first started working together as Clamp Cluster they created dōjinshi for Captain Tsubasa and yaoi dōjinshi for Saint Seiya, and sold it at different dōjinshi conventions, (Wu,…show more content…
Cosplay (コスプレ kosupure) is the act of dressing up, and often acting, like a fictional character, (Dictionary.com). Cosplay has its roots in the Star Trek conventions of the 1960s, and anime wasn’t associated with cosplaying until 1977 when people cosplayed at that year’s Comiket, (Galbraith, 2009). Slowly, but surely cosplaying emerged as an industry and by 1997 there were companies devoted specifically to creating and selling high quality cosplay outfits and cosplay accessories, (Galbraith, 2009). In 2007, Japan’s largest cosplay networking site Cure, estimated that there were nearly 200,000 devoted cosplayers in Japan, (Galbraith, 2009), and cosplaying as an industry brought in easily over $35 billion in 2008, (Hayden,
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